Strictly Confidential: Here Are 3 Types of Confidential Documents You Should Keep an Eye on at Your Workplace

confidential records

A recent study found that most companies don’t have the technology to keep employees from sharing confidential documents. What’s worse, 68% of companies surveyed said they don’t know where their confidential info is stored.

Part of keeping your company’s confidential documents safe is understanding what types of documents are confidential. Here’s a list of 3 types of confidential documentation that you should take good care of.

1. Contracts and Commercial Documents

Some of the most important confidential documents include contracts and other business documents. Confidential documentation must be properly handled and stored to protect both your organization and the third-party.

Most contracts have a confidentiality clause. Your contract with important clients could become void if it fell into the wrong hands. Plus, contracts have a lot of sensitive data. Such as the cost of the services, and the names of the involved parties. If a competitor got their hands on this document, they could use it to hurt your business or steal your clients.

Make sure you limit physical copies of commercial documents. Keep those copies in a confidential file that is not easily accessible.

You may also consider offsite record storage for additional security.

2. Confidential Employee Information

Another important aspect of confidential documentation is employee information. This includes personal data such as Social Security Numbers, date of birth, marital status, and mailing address.

Identity theft is a huge issue that requires constant vigilance. In fact, in 2017 one in 15 people were victims of identity theft.

Safe employee information prevents identity theft and fraud. But there’s much more employee information that should be housed in a confidential file. This includes employee resumes, background checks, interview notes and tests, performance reviews and disciplinary paperwork. Employment information such as pay rate, employment contract, level of benefits, vacation and bonuses are also confidential documentation.

There are also a number of admin info related to employees that need to be kept safe. This includes pay stubs or direct deposit forms. Tax forms, time sheets, and any other payroll documentation as well. Even once an employee is no longer an employee, you still need to keep their data confidential. For example, resignation letters, unemployment claims, and termination records.

3. Office Plans and Internal Documentation

Many people don’t realize that their office floor plans, seating arrangements, internal processes, and procedure manuals are confidential documents.

Most organizations have detailed office layouts that include exits, seating plans and so on. You likely also have some procedures that employees need to be able to do their work. Sure, all your employees have access to them. But you don’t want it to get into the hands of those who would use it for nefarious purposes.

If you can, store these documents electronically. Ask employees to limit print outs. And when a version becomes old, make sure it is securely shredded.

Final Thoughts on Confidential Documents at Work

We hope this list helps you see the extent of the confidential documents in your organization. By becoming more aware of what counts as confidential, you can take steps to ensure it is safe.

Need help coming up with a records management and shredding plan to keep your documents safe? Contact us. We help companies in and around Fort Wayne keep their confidential records safe and we can help you too.

Next, learn 5 ways to avoid customer data theft.