Why Every Business Needs a Records Retention Policy

In only the first half of 2018, data breaches comprised 4.5 billion records. 56% were stolen from outsiders. 9% was due to accidental loss.

While most of us don’t think about the documents, both paper and electronic, we create, if you’re a business owner, not having a records retention policy could cause you a lot of problems.

Creating a corporate document policy has a lot of benefits. You shouldn’t be saving everything nor should you fail to retain certain records.

If you’re wondering why you need to implement document retention policy best practices in your office, keep reading. We’re sharing with you a few reasons to adopt an information retention policy today.

A Records Retention Policy is Required in Certain Industries

Certain industries are bound by laws to comply with state and federal privacy laws regarding how long certain documents should be kept. Destroying records before that time can result in hefty penalties.

Also, in certain industries, you may need to retain certain records in order to defend your business against other claims. Make sure your business is complying with current and new regulations regarding document retention.

Saves Money and Time

It costs money to maintain records you no longer need. It also costs money if your business is named in a lawsuit and you no longer have access to the records you need to prove your case.

Having too much clutter also costs your business valuable time and energy when employees can’t locate vital documents. Clutter decreases productivity and increases depression and anxiety.

It also costs money to store old files you no longer legally need whether you keep it in your office, filing cabinets, cloud storage or hard drives.

Keeps Your Records Secure

It’s not always readily apparent if your records have been hacked or stolen. And unfortunately, 70% of attacks are on small businesses. 60% of those hacked businesses went under after six months.

Creating a documentation policy should always include taking measures to ensure your records remain safe. And there should be a policy that includes safety measures for both hard copies and digital.

Make sure security is your number one priority and include it as a part of employee training. It should also become a standard part of your workplace’s process. It’s easier to prevent theft when everyone at your company is on the lookout.

Improving Efficiency

Creating a policy on where and how long to save documents helps you develop an organizational system for storing, retrieving, and record-keeping. Doing so makes it easier for everyone to locate and retrieve the information they need more quickly.

Documents are less likely to go missing. Implementing such a policy also ensures that expired documents are instantly flagged.

Part of the document retention policy should include how documents are destroyed. You can’t throw confidential information in the trash. Instead, find ways to securely destroy old documents to thwart would-be thieves.

How to Safely Destroy Documents

The best and safest way to destroy hard copies of documents is to shred them. However, your basic office shredder won’t be able to handle such a large job. Nor do you want to have to appoint an employee to handle all the shredding of confidential documents. And you also don’t want to leave one employee in charge of securely destroying all your digital information.

Instead, appoint an employee to contact a professional records management company. They can safely, quickly, and securely destroy all your old documents — paper and electronic.

Contact Us to Keep Your Records Safe

We can help you implement a working records retention policy and we’re here when you need us to destroy digital and hard copies safely.

Click here to contact us to find out how we can help.

A Guide on how to Manage Hospital’s Paper Documents

Keeping up with hospital documents can be a big deal. First of all, you have a ton of different files from many different patients. Add in the fact that each and every one of those files is confidential and it’s not hard to see how problematic it can be.

It can seem like a difficult challenge to keep up with all of the papers in the hospital, but what exactly can you do to make it easier? It’s not like the papers are just going to stop flowing in or make themselves easier to manage.

Luckily, there are ways for hospitals to manage paper documents that you can incorporate into your office routine. Keep reading this article to find out what you can do to make it happen.

How Hospitals Manage Their Paper Documents

There are more ways to handle your healthcare documents than you think. Here are just a few things that you can do to make your life easier.

Incorporate a Document Management System

One of the best things that you can do for your office is to incorporate a document management system to help you keep track of your files. Doing so will make it easier to organize and file all of the hospital information.

It can be difficult to keep track of things manually, and searching and placing files take time out of your workday. That can all change when you have a management system do it for you.

With the management system, you will have an automatic means to track your files and make sure they are sorted out, so you know that the job is done right the first time.

Set a Timer

Setting a timer is another good thing that you can do. One of the easiest ways to lose track of your records is to not have a set time when you dispose of them. This can lead to you losing track of the archived data in your system.

Doing something as simple as setting a turnaround time for when you discard your old data can remove the hassle of having documents that are months or even years old cluttering up your space.

Train New Hires

You don’t have time to deal with all of the filing yourself. That’s why you should get new hires to do it for you.

With people working on a dedicated task, you can be sure they will document the files properly and make sure that everything is in order. The best part is that the job can be done with little effect on your budget.

We Can Help

Taking care of your files can be a hassle, no matter how verse you might be. That’s why we would love to help you out with handling your documents.

We help the government, private businesses, and hospitals manage paper documents through the use of shredders, hard drive disposal, and teaching safe disposal practices so we can help you to take care of the files you need destroyed.

Ready to get started? Give us a call. We look forward to helping you soon.

5 Essential Strategies to Heighten Customer Data Protection

Did you know that it’s your responsibility as a company to safeguard customer information?

Inside threats are some of the most significant threats to security in an organization. An employee or other stakeholders may breach data either intentionally or unintentionally. Protecting customer information doesn’t need to be a challenge.

Customer data is a valuable resource and businesses should be smart when handling crucial data to avoid losing it or exposing it to third parties.

In 2016, there was a data breach at Uber after hackers accessed private information for millions of customers. The company used over $140 million in compensation. The incident damaged the firm’s reputation for failure to protect data.

Most recently, Equifax and Capital One both experienced data breaches that exposed the personal information of hundreds of millions of customers. You may be wondering, if these large businesses can’t protect customer data, how can I?

In this guide, discover quick strategies to heighten your business customer data protection plan.

1. Educating your Employees

Research has shown that most data breaches are caused by employees unintentionally. Ignorance among employees is dangerous and the management should ensure that they are well-informed about various measures to protect customer data.

The education program should include information about how to properly store and dispose of confidential documents

2. Keeping Technology Up to Date

If you keep electronic documents, keeping technology up to date is an essential step for any organization that values the security of its customer data. Ensure that all devices have the latest anti-virus software and all users should be educated about the need to allow recommended virus updates.

3. Access to Customer Data

Not every employee needs access to your customer’s or employee’s personal information. Keep access to sensitive customer information limited to those who need it to perform their job duties. The fewer people who have access to data, the fewer opportunities for a breach.

4. Destroy Data No Longer Needed

Knowing how and when to destroy documents and data will help ensure your customers, employees, and businesses personal information stays safe. Determine how and when to destroy digital and paper documents and stay up to date with Data Disposal Laws.

Different professions have different requirements under the Data Disposal Laws. Make sure you follow the best practices of your industry.

Develop guidelines and policies for data retention inside your business to handle the storage and destruction of documents and data.

5. Work With a Professional

Customer data is a valuable resource for all firms. Businesses should safeguard it using all possible measures as failure to do so can damage an organization’s reputation and lead to huge losses.

Working with a professional company such as Federal Records Management & Shredding in Fort Wayne, IN is one of the best ways to protect confidential documents and data. Professional Records Management companies can help train employees on how to handle your customer’s and your businesses personal information as well as help you set data retention policies.

Simply deleting data or using store-bought shredders isn’t enough. A professional destruction company can help you make sure that your files are properly destroyed.

Need help protecting your businesses sensitive information? Contact us today to learn more about our records management, hard drive destruction, and on-site and off-site shredding services.

FERPA Regulations 101: How to Effectively Manage Educational Records

Students learn a lot, about a lot of things, during their time in class. College students learn about everything from physics equations to the thematic components of Manhattan Transfer. Most of all, they learn about their rights as students.

FERPA regulations guide how colleges and universities must handle student information. However, FERPA doesn’t just concern colleges, students, and educational information. The acronym stands for the Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Act since it also governs how administrators should maintain and distribute information to families.

Any educational institution that receives federal funding must abide by the rules set by FERPA. Otherwise, you can face worse consequences than losing funding; violating the law can result in criminal prosecution and accreditation loss. Make sure you don’t accidentally violate this vital law by learning more about it.

Keep reading below to learn more about how FERPA regulates how you can handle student information, and how you can stay in compliance with it!

Know What to Define as an Educational Record

The first thing you should understand about FERPA is that it sets clear guidelines on what is considered an educational record. Documents such as class schedules, grades, or anything else relating a student’s academic life is an educational record. Yet, anything involving university police or digital communications are not covered.

This means that anyone can request to view records of digital communications or police records since they’re public information. They’re not protected by FERPA, and public universities will need to comply with public information requests.

FERPA Regulations Limit Who Can View Files

FERPA explicitly states that students can view their own records, but only them. Nobody can request to see a student’s records unless the student themselves requests the record. It doesn’t matter if the person requesting records is a professor or a member of the student’s family.

This is meant to protect students’ privacy and allow them to have more control over their academic lives. It enables them to focus on what matters most: classes.

FERPA Protects Three Kinds of Information

There are three types of information that FERPA protects: educational information, personally identifiable information, and directory information. While each category has specific degrees of protection associated with it, it is generally illegal to distribute them. You can only give those kinds of information to the students they’re about.

Educational information can include anything about the student’s education, such as classes or grades. The category of personally identifiable information covers anything that can be used to identify a specific person, such as social security numbers*. Finally, directory information is a more unique kind of record.

Directory information can be distributed, as long as the university notifies students that their directory information may be released. This kind of information includes basic details such as names or addresses. It’s important to remember that the student should have time to request that their information remains private.

Violating FERPA Has Severe Consequences

Violating FERPA regulations will have severe consequences, no matter who you are or whatever institution you work for. Releasing information that should remain private will result in an investigation. You will also face consequences for failing to protect student information, too.

Keeping these confidential documents confidential also means knowing how to manage them. That’s why you should leave handling sensitive documents to the professionals. Contact us if you need a better way to maintain student information. We know FERPA inside and out, and will make sure you stay in compliance with it!

5 Tips for Safe and Sustainable E-Waste Disposal

Did you know that the average American family throws out 176 pounds of e-waste every year? That’s equal to about 400 iPhones. Examples of e-waste include smartphones, tablets, printers, and computers.

Businesses have even more e-waste to dispose of each year. After all, they have more monitors, printers, and hard drives than the average family. These items can quickly become outdated and when a device reaches the end of its lifespan, it’s time to replace it.

But what do you do with items when you know longer need them? These five tips will help you manage e-waste disposal for your company.

1. Find Local E-Waste Disposal Programs

The first thing to do is check in with your local waste disposal programs. Your local government may have programs in place to manage e-garbage with little trouble. Other local businesses may also have programs for the recycling of e-waste. As a business, you may have more e-waste than they expect. Talk to them, and make arrangements to handle the amount of e-waste your business produces.

2. Donate Used Items

Another way to deal with electronic devices that are no longer needed in your business is to donate them. Provided the items are in good working order, they can be redistributed.

3. Sell Working Devices

Another thing your business can do is resell used devices you no longer need. As long as it’s in good working order, you shouldn’t have a problem selling an iPhone or a computer on eBay or Craig’s List. You may even be able to sell devices that don’t work any longer. Some purchasers salvage parts from these devices to fix other devices.

4. Plan Ahead

One of the causes of e-waste is a lack of planning. Purchasing equipment such as a computer is a business decision you plan and cost carefully. You should also make sure you plan for the end of the item’s life, including how it will be disposed of. You may not think of smaller items, such as portable hard drives or other electronic gadgets. Many of these items are handed out at conferences, so you may not think twice about trashing them. If you attend a conference with these gifts, ask if there’s a program for recycling them. If you don’t need one, don’t take one. If you’re planning the conference, be sure to think ahead about disposal before you opt for these gifts. The best way to reduce electronic garbage is to buy less in the first place.

5. Check the Recycler’s Credentials

There will be times when you can’t avoid needing to dispose of your e-waste. When that happens, always be sure to check the credentials of the recycler you choose. Working with a certified recycling company means you can trust your e-waste is disposed of properly.

Protecting Your Business

You have many options for e-waste disposal. Keep in mind that disposal isn’t always the right answer for your electronic devices. Keeping your data safe should be one of your top priorities. In some cases, you’ll need to use other measures when you have devices that have reached the end of their lifespan such as destroy the hard drives to protect confidential information.

Our blog has many more tips for keeping all your business data safe. Read up on how to destroy a hard drive or the benefits of paper shredding to protect your data.

Employee Privacy Laws: How to Protect Employee Privacy

Employee privacy and information is crucial data that must be protected at all costs. Failure to do so can lead to petty arguments about pay all the way up to multi-million dollar lawsuits. Yet many employers are so caught up in the day-to-day running of their business, they forget to put the right measures in place.

Follow these guidelines if you have recently found yourself concerned about whether or not you are doing the right things.

Protect Employee Privacy with Cyber Security

Over 14 million businesses in the US are at risk of being targeted by hackers. From email phishing campaigns to DDoS attacks, once your servers are compromised, anything is up for grabs.

Businesses worry about their client’s data and their own trade secrets. But they forget that vital employee data like social security numbers and bank accounts are all stored as well. 

It’s vital your IT department is given the resources and training to prevent and even block an attack should it happen. 

While you can by software to help, you ultimately need a dedicated person or team working to keep your records safe.

Limit Access to Information

Managing employee information and payroll is a special task that requires confidentiality and trust. But even then, accidents happen and people can make mistakes. That’s why it’s advised to diversify the tasks among employees. This way, they only have access to certain parts of the information but not all of it. 

For example, if someone’s role is to handle wages, then they don’t need to be the one also dealing with tax-withholding forms and other data. Of course. this can be difficult if you are a small business and only have one person working on this or use a software program. In these situations, you should work with the software help center. Often, they are able to advise on restricting access, limiting information, and even offer enhanced security measures. 

Never assume the data is secure and safe until it’s been checked over by a professional.

Avoid Accidental Leaks

Another issue that businesses have faced in the past is privacy leaks from word-of-mouth or even glances at a computer screen.

When you hire people to handle sensitive data it is important to give them proper training and guidance. Rules such as ensuring they have exited the software before leaving their desks and changing passwords frequently can help.

You should also stress the risks of disclosing information and layout enforceable consequences should it happen. Confidentiality agreements and provisions for immediate termination are great ways to make this happen if local policies allow it.

Employees handling sensitive information should also be given their own private spaces to work. An employee passing by or coming up to talk may accidentally see information they shouldn’t have. If they share it without thinking, it could lead to issues and even liability.

Open plan spaces are only fine for departments which have ad-hoc projects and collaboration.  

Be Thorough

As your business grows and becomes more complex it’s essential to reevaluate older policies and practices.

If you think your security measures need to be updated to protect employee privacy then start working on it immediately. 

Check out our services and see how our processes ensure all handled data is safe and secure.

5 Reasons Data Protection Is More Important Than Ever for Your Business Today

Why is privacy important to your business? 

Your business has as much as a 25% chance of experiencing a data breach. That’s according to a report by IBM released in 2017. The best course of action is to assume your business will experience a data breach. At the very least, you must assume that you’ll be attacked in some fashion.

Here are five reasons to take business data protection seriously:

1. The Threat is Constant

Today, it’s almost impossible to completely avoid hackers. The Hollywood version of a hacker sitting in a dark room trying to guess a password is inaccurate. Hackers have an advanced arsenal of malware, automation, and social engineering tools at their disposal.

Automated bots crawl the web every day looking for vulnerabilities in websites. Phishing scams are constant. Chances are, your email provider has filtered out numerous possible phishing emails this month alone. Create a “Zero Trust” culture at your business to stay protected.

2. Data Breaches Are More Expensive Than Ever

Data breaches can cost businesses millions of dollars. Large companies can sometimes absorb these expenses but it damages their reputation and puts clients sensitive information at risk. For smaller businesses, a data breach can lead to business failure.

Malware, like ransomware, can lock your data until you pay a large fee. Other data breaches could lead to a loss of customers or disruptions to your operations.

3. Hackers are Getting Smarter

81% of all data breaches exploit privileged access to data. That means hackers find a way into your system by gaining one of your employee’s credentials. There are indirect ways hackers can gain this information. If one of your employees uses the same login information for all their personal and professional accounts, a data breach elsewhere could compromise your own system.

It’s common for scammers to trick people to open emails and click on malicious links. All they’d need to do is find someone from your leadership team on LinkedIn, create a phony email profile, then email one of your employees posing as their boss.

4. Data Is Important to Your Business

Data helps you optimize your operations and maintain accurate records. It can also help you serve customers more effectively. Data gives you a competitive advantage. And it’s a necessary tool in today’s business environment. But not all data is useful. Some of it gets old or becomes obsolete.

Delete obsolete data periodically to protect your business. If you have printed records that are no longer useful, you should shred and dispose of them offsite.

5. Your Reputation Depends on Data Security

If you’ve followed any of the high-profile data breaches in the news, you know this already. A data breach can do long-term damage to your company’s reputation. This is especially true when customer data is involved. If you keep customer data, your customers are trusting you to keep it safe. They also trust you to dispose of it safely when you no longer need it.

Why Is Privacy Important to Your Business?

If you have a small business, you may be asking yourself, “Why is privacy important?” Don’t assume you’re safe from hackers because you aren’t a global enterprise. Take steps now to implement business data protection across your company now.

Do you have a business in the Fort Wayne area of Indiana? Federal Records Management & Shredding can help you keep all your records safe. Contact us today to learn what you can do to protect your data and destroy records responsibly.

Why Shred Documents? The Benefits of Shredding

Have you ever been the victim of identity theft? If so, you know what a huge hassle it is – not to mention how unsettling it is to have your privacy invaded. If you haven’t, you definitely don’t want to experience it. That’s why it’s important to shred documents that have any of your personal information on them.

Identity Theft Is No Joke

The FTC estimates that recovering from identity theft takes an average of six months and 200 hours of work. That means victims will spend about a total of 200 hours making phone calls, writing correspondence, keeping track of creditors, responding to letters, working with credit bureaus and law enforcement agencies, and taking any other actions required to ensure they won’t be liable for debts falsely created in their names. And in 2017, there were 16.7 million victims of identity fraud. This was a record high number that the record set the year before. So it’s clear that this is a problem that’s not going away any time soon.

Of course, unless you’re living under a rock, you can’t be completely safe from identity theft. But making the effort to shred important documents will greatly improve the chances that you won’t be a victim of this latest crime.

Shred Documents to Provide Peace of Mind

Of course, you want to get rid of documents with your personal information. This includes ANYTHING with your full name and address, home or work telephone numbers, and/or driver’s license number.

Some documents you may not have considered are:

  • Tax returns (over three years old)
  • Bank statements
  • Canceled or voided checks
  • Pay stubs
  • Convenience checks

Also, keep in mind that identity thieves don’t care whose identity they’re stealing. If they happen upon your child’s Social Security number, it’s fair game. So be sure to shred any mail concerning your children, such as their medical records, copies of birth certificates, school applications, report cards and even permission slips you’ve authorized for field trips.

And finally, don’t forget about junk mail. The computer barcodes on the front of most junk mail could contain personally identifying information. So run your junk mail through the shredder. This includes mail from insurance companies/lenders or any membership organizations, as well as credit card offers and any return envelopes that come with these mailings.

Shredding Is Environmentally Friendly

Beyond just the security measures you’re taking for yourself in putting all of those documents through the shredder, you’re taking additional security measures for the planet. Shredding your paper waste is going to be easier to recycle. And since paper can be recycled up to seven times and still be used, this means considerably less cutting down of trees.

Plus, all the excess waste created from simply throwing away paper just causes the landfills to fill up faster.

Are You a Target?

The truth is, anyone with a social security number is a target for identity thieves. But if you shred documents with important information, they’re far less likely to catch up with you.

Don’t worry. If it all feels too overwhelming, then contact us today to learn more about our secure off-site and on-site document shredding services for business or check out our free shred events for personal use. Stay safe.

A Simple Guide to Understanding Shredder Security Levels

Not all shredders are created equally. Instead, there are a number of different factors which go into making sure that your record destruction meets certain standards. When you’re trying to discover which shredder is right for destroying paperwork from your business then you’ll need to understand shredder security levels.

Read on and we’ll explain exactly what you need to know so you can stay in compliance with modern standards.

Which Shredder Security Level Do I Need?

Before we get into the requirements for each level of security, it’s important to understand that not everyone needs something which is going to meet the highest security standards. But, wouldn’t you want to make sure that all of the documents you’re getting rid of are properly destroyed?

You may think “I’m just disposing of some old records with no personal information, I don’t really need NSA level security.” Which may be true, but if it’s worth shredding, it’s worth shredding properly.

Paper shredders which operate at level 4 are enough for most commercial uses, although those who handle a lot of sensitive information may want to go with a level 5 paper shredder instead.

FACTA compliance is a big issue for many companies since all consumer information now requires a high level of protection. A level 4 shredder is the bare minimum which can be used for disposing of this information.

Shredder Security Levels

Currently, the code for security levels is covered under DIN 66399. This European standard has been adopted stateside, although there are some slight deviations put in place by the NSA for top secret documents.

The levels in place are the following:

Level 1

Level 1 shredding is mostly used just to get paper out of the way. It’s suitable for much of the paperwork which comes through an office and doesn’t carry any sensitive information.

Old brochures and the like are commonly shredded at this level.

Level 2

Level 2 shredders can be used to dispose of slightly sensitive internal communications. Memos, forms without personal information, out-of-date instructions, or travel guidelines are good examples of documents which should be shredded in compliance with this level.

Level 3

Sales reports, receipts, and other financial information which doesn’t contain personal identifying information can be handled with a level 3 shredder. These aren’t HIPAA or FACTA compliant, however.

Level 4

The first level of shredding which is compliant with HIPAA and FACTA standards. All customer personal identifying information should be handled with at least a level 4 shredder in order to assure security.

Level 5

Level 5 shredders are probably the highest standard in common commercial usage. They should be considered if you’re planning on disposing of strategic paperwork for your company, competitor analysis, and other information which can be used in corporate espionage.

Level 6

Often used in healthcare and financial environments for a blanket level of security, level 6 shredders are able to handle some of the most sensitive information. At this level of shredding it’s extremely unlikely that someone will be able to reproduce the papers even with state-of-the-art technology.

Level 7

The highest standard currently in place is level 7. It’s used primarily by government entities like the NSA in order to ensure that even the most sensitive and dangerous information can’t be reproduced.

While some of the higher level shredders may help destroy your documents, high-security shredders tend to be slower and can interrupt the workflow in your place of business. Instead, why not save yourself time and money by choosing a document shredding service

Picking a Shredding Service

Fortunately, you don’t have to keep track of all of this if you choose to invest in the right document managing service. Shredder security levels are a good thing to know but wouldn’t it be better to know that your documents are held in a secure location until their final destruction? And, they’re destroyed with papers from other companies, so there’s no way anyone would be able to reconstruct your sensitive documents.

Contact us today and let’s see what we can do to help you make sure you stay in compliance with the law and protect your sensitive information from prying eyes.

5 Things Healthcare Businesses Should Know About HIPAA Compliance

Any business or organization that comes into contact with protected health information needs to make sure that they are within HIPAA compliance guidelines. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has strict rules when it comes to people who deal with protected health information (PHI). This in conjunction with the increase in data breaches might have you feeling a bit overwhelmed.

But don’t worry, being HIPPA compliant won’t reduce your company’s efficiency and if you follow the list we’ve compiled, it won’t be hard either. We’ll start by explaining the rule then give you tips on how to stay compliant.

Privacy

The privacy rule deals with who is allowed access to the PHI. You need to make sure that your client’s information is protected. Managing the records is one of the most important parts to make sure the PHI stays protected. An easy way to do this is to delegate a person, to be responsible for this policy. They should train everyone on the policy and have the ability to implement consequences if the policy is broken. Your policy should be stricter than the HIPPA guidelines, this leaves a safeguard between your policy and breaking the law.

Security

There are three parts to the security of PHI. You need technological safeguards, along with physical and administrative safeguards.

1. Technological safeguards have to to with the actual technology that stores the PHI. You need to make sure that each of your clients has a name or ID number that’s unique to them. You also need to make sure IT has it set up that the programs you use will automatically sign the users out due to inactivity.

2. Physical safeguards are put in place to make sure only the right people have access to the PHI.This includes making sure that there are theft deterrents. When disposing of the devices you need to make sure to do it in a way that people who are looking to get there hands on PHI can’t get to it.

If you are worried about your policy for getting rid of the devices, you can always contact a company like ours.

3. Administrative safeguards are the things you can do to make sure you give are acting within HIPAA compliance. Make sure that you are doing risk assessments every few months to see where you might be vulnerable. You need to also monitor your employees to make sure the policies are being followed.

Enforcement

Violations can get costly. You want to avoid getting hit with expensive fines by making sure information is used only for what it is intended for. Giving your clients the ability to access their own information is also important, just make sure you have the technical safeguards.

Breach Notification

If there is a breach you need to notify HHS and your clients within 60 days. They will need to know what was breached, where it happened and what the damages could possibly be.

Have Written Policies

HIPPA audits can happen at any time. One of the best ways to make sure that you are prepared for this is to have written policies in place.

HIPAA Compliance

You don’t have a choice to be within HIPAA compliance guidelines. But it doesn’t have to be a pain to manage either. If you still need more help after reading our list, contact us.