Shredding Paper: 5 Common Paper Shredding Mistakes to Avoid

Paperwork is scattered around your desk and your filing cabinet is about to burst. Some of your documents may be recent but a lot of them date back to a year ago or further. This is a huge paper shredding mistake.

Anyone from interns, cleaning staff, or other employees can access your office and see all sorts of confidential information that you’ve neglected to do away with. This is a pretty common mistake too and one that business owners make when it comes to shredding paper.

There are plenty of other mistakes that you need to avoid. Keep reading to see what they are so you can keep your business information secure.

1. Not Having a Document Shredding Policy

Have you told all of your employees what they should be doing with old, outdated documents? Have you written up a document destruction policy of any kind? Old documents can’t be done away with if your workers don’t know what to do with them.

For every minute your confidential documents sit around you’re risking identity theft and business fraud. Write up a policy and give each of your employees a copy or hold a business meeting and go over it with them. Need help? Our professional document shredders can help you develop your Document Destruction Policy and help train your staff.

2. Hoarding Old Documents

How many expired documents do you have sitting around in your office or filing cabinet? If the answer is more than a handful you need to sort through them and do away with them immediately.

Hoarding documents has its share of security risks. Anyone can break-in and if they do then they now have access to confidential information.

3. Shredding With Your Office Shredder

Yes, you need to get rid of your documents but you shouldn’t do so with your personal office shredder. Personal paper shredders have their limits. As it says in the manual, they need to “rest after 30 minutes of us.” So while you’re waiting you’re not only wasting your time, but that’s even more time that you’re confidential documents are left laying around.

Plus, most store-bought paper shredders can only shred around 10-15 sheets of paper at a time. Any more and you’re dealing with a paper jam.

Also, storebought shredders don’t shred the paper fine meaning that although it won’t be easy, anyone can pull shreds of paper out of the trash bin and piece them back together.

Time is money, stop wasting it by spending countless hours shredding your confidential documents.

4. You Have Bad Paper Recycling Habits

We know that you want to try to help the environment, but throwing your confidential documents, shredded or not, in the recycling bin is a bad idea. Any thief worth their salt can grab documents out of the recycling bin. Again, even if you shred them someone who is seriously dedicated can piece them back together and read them.

5. Not Using a Certified Shredding Provider

All of the examples above can be solved if you use a certified shredding provider to do the job. They can shred, and recycle your old documents in the most confidential manner possible.

When shredded, your documents are combined with documents from other companies. There’s no chance that anyone would be able to piece together finely shredded material from multiple sources.

Make sure that whatever company you go through for this service is NAID AAA Certified.

It’s Possible to Mess Up Shredding Paper

It is possible for you to mess up when shredding paper in your small business. If you use an office shredder and toss the pieces in the bin,  thieves can get in and get access to your confidential information. Protect your company by following these tips and using a certified shredding provider instead. For a small monthly fee, you can keep your documents safe and not have to spend hours shredding them yourself.

Do you need the pile of documents on your desk shredded? Contact us to get a free estimate on our document shredding services.

Why Every Business Needs a Records Retention Policy

In only the first half of 2018, data breaches comprised 4.5 billion records. 56% were stolen from outsiders. 9% was due to accidental loss.

While most of us don’t think about the documents, both paper and electronic, we create, if you’re a business owner, not having a records retention policy could cause you a lot of problems.

Creating a corporate document policy has a lot of benefits. You shouldn’t be saving everything nor should you fail to retain certain records.

If you’re wondering why you need to implement document retention policy best practices in your office, keep reading. We’re sharing with you a few reasons to adopt an information retention policy today.

A Records Retention Policy is Required in Certain Industries

Certain industries are bound by laws to comply with state and federal privacy laws regarding how long certain documents should be kept. Destroying records before that time can result in hefty penalties.

Also, in certain industries, you may need to retain certain records in order to defend your business against other claims. Make sure your business is complying with current and new regulations regarding document retention.

Saves Money and Time

It costs money to maintain records you no longer need. It also costs money if your business is named in a lawsuit and you no longer have access to the records you need to prove your case.

Having too much clutter also costs your business valuable time and energy when employees can’t locate vital documents. Clutter decreases productivity and increases depression and anxiety.

It also costs money to store old files you no longer legally need whether you keep it in your office, filing cabinets, cloud storage or hard drives.

Keeps Your Records Secure

It’s not always readily apparent if your records have been hacked or stolen. And unfortunately, 70% of attacks are on small businesses. 60% of those hacked businesses went under after six months.

Creating a documentation policy should always include taking measures to ensure your records remain safe. And there should be a policy that includes safety measures for both hard copies and digital.

Make sure security is your number one priority and include it as a part of employee training. It should also become a standard part of your workplace’s process. It’s easier to prevent theft when everyone at your company is on the lookout.

Improving Efficiency

Creating a policy on where and how long to save documents helps you develop an organizational system for storing, retrieving, and record-keeping. Doing so makes it easier for everyone to locate and retrieve the information they need more quickly.

Documents are less likely to go missing. Implementing such a policy also ensures that expired documents are instantly flagged.

Part of the document retention policy should include how documents are destroyed. You can’t throw confidential information in the trash. Instead, find ways to securely destroy old documents to thwart would-be thieves.

How to Safely Destroy Documents

The best and safest way to destroy hard copies of documents is to shred them. However, your basic office shredder won’t be able to handle such a large job. Nor do you want to have to appoint an employee to handle all the shredding of confidential documents. And you also don’t want to leave one employee in charge of securely destroying all your digital information.

Instead, appoint an employee to contact a professional records management company. They can safely, quickly, and securely destroy all your old documents — paper and electronic.

Contact Us to Keep Your Records Safe

We can help you implement a working records retention policy and we’re here when you need us to destroy digital and hard copies safely.

Click here to contact us to find out how we can help.

A Guide on how to Manage Hospital’s Paper Documents

Keeping up with hospital documents can be a big deal. First of all, you have a ton of different files from many different patients. Add in the fact that each and every one of those files is confidential and it’s not hard to see how problematic it can be.

It can seem like a difficult challenge to keep up with all of the papers in the hospital, but what exactly can you do to make it easier? It’s not like the papers are just going to stop flowing in or make themselves easier to manage.

Luckily, there are ways for hospitals to manage paper documents that you can incorporate into your office routine. Keep reading this article to find out what you can do to make it happen.

How Hospitals Manage Their Paper Documents

There are more ways to handle your healthcare documents than you think. Here are just a few things that you can do to make your life easier.

Incorporate a Document Management System

One of the best things that you can do for your office is to incorporate a document management system to help you keep track of your files. Doing so will make it easier to organize and file all of the hospital information.

It can be difficult to keep track of things manually, and searching and placing files take time out of your workday. That can all change when you have a management system do it for you.

With the management system, you will have an automatic means to track your files and make sure they are sorted out, so you know that the job is done right the first time.

Set a Timer

Setting a timer is another good thing that you can do. One of the easiest ways to lose track of your records is to not have a set time when you dispose of them. This can lead to you losing track of the archived data in your system.

Doing something as simple as setting a turnaround time for when you discard your old data can remove the hassle of having documents that are months or even years old cluttering up your space.

Train New Hires

You don’t have time to deal with all of the filing yourself. That’s why you should get new hires to do it for you.

With people working on a dedicated task, you can be sure they will document the files properly and make sure that everything is in order. The best part is that the job can be done with little effect on your budget.

We Can Help

Taking care of your files can be a hassle, no matter how verse you might be. That’s why we would love to help you out with handling your documents.

We help the government, private businesses, and hospitals manage paper documents through the use of shredders, hard drive disposal, and teaching safe disposal practices so we can help you to take care of the files you need destroyed.

Ready to get started? Give us a call. We look forward to helping you soon.

5 Essential Strategies to Heighten Customer Data Protection

Did you know that it’s your responsibility as a company to safeguard customer information?

Inside threats are some of the most significant threats to security in an organization. An employee or other stakeholders may breach data either intentionally or unintentionally. Protecting customer information doesn’t need to be a challenge.

Customer data is a valuable resource and businesses should be smart when handling crucial data to avoid losing it or exposing it to third parties.

In 2016, there was a data breach at Uber after hackers accessed private information for millions of customers. The company used over $140 million in compensation. The incident damaged the firm’s reputation for failure to protect data.

Most recently, Equifax and Capital One both experienced data breaches that exposed the personal information of hundreds of millions of customers. You may be wondering, if these large businesses can’t protect customer data, how can I?

In this guide, discover quick strategies to heighten your business customer data protection plan.

1. Educating your Employees

Research has shown that most data breaches are caused by employees unintentionally. Ignorance among employees is dangerous and the management should ensure that they are well-informed about various measures to protect customer data.

The education program should include information about how to properly store and dispose of confidential documents

2. Keeping Technology Up to Date

If you keep electronic documents, keeping technology up to date is an essential step for any organization that values the security of its customer data. Ensure that all devices have the latest anti-virus software and all users should be educated about the need to allow recommended virus updates.

3. Access to Customer Data

Not every employee needs access to your customer’s or employee’s personal information. Keep access to sensitive customer information limited to those who need it to perform their job duties. The fewer people who have access to data, the fewer opportunities for a breach.

4. Destroy Data No Longer Needed

Knowing how and when to destroy documents and data will help ensure your customers, employees, and businesses personal information stays safe. Determine how and when to destroy digital and paper documents and stay up to date with Data Disposal Laws.

Different professions have different requirements under the Data Disposal Laws. Make sure you follow the best practices of your industry.

Develop guidelines and policies for data retention inside your business to handle the storage and destruction of documents and data.

5. Work With a Professional

Customer data is a valuable resource for all firms. Businesses should safeguard it using all possible measures as failure to do so can damage an organization’s reputation and lead to huge losses.

Working with a professional company such as Federal Records Management & Shredding in Fort Wayne, IN is one of the best ways to protect confidential documents and data. Professional Records Management companies can help train employees on how to handle your customer’s and your businesses personal information as well as help you set data retention policies.

Simply deleting data or using store-bought shredders isn’t enough. A professional destruction company can help you make sure that your files are properly destroyed.

Need help protecting your businesses sensitive information? Contact us today to learn more about our records management, hard drive destruction, and on-site and off-site shredding services.

5 Essential Strategies to Heighten Customer Data Protection

customer data protection

Did you know that it’s your responsibility as a company to safeguard customer information?

Inside threats are some of the most significant threats to security in an organization. An employee or other stakeholders may breach data either intentionally or unintentionally. Protecting customer information doesn’t need to be a challenge.

Customer data is a valuable resource and businesses should be smart when handling crucial data to avoid losing it or exposing it to third parties.

In 2016, there was a data breach at Uber after hackers accessed private information for millions of customers. The company used over $140 million in compensation. The incident damaged the firm’s reputation for failure to protect data.

Most recently, Equifax and Capital One both experienced data breaches that exposed the personal information of hundreds of millions of customers. You may be wondering, if these large businesses can’t protect customer data, how can I?

In this guide, discover quick strategies to heighten your business customer data protection plan.

1. Educating your Employees

Research has shown that most data breaches are caused by employees unintentionally. Ignorance among employees is dangerous and the management should ensure that they are well-informed about various measures to protect customer data.

The education program should include information about how to properly store and dispose of confidential documents

2. Keeping Technology Up to Date

If you keep electronic documents, keeping technology up to date is an essential step for any organization that values the security of its customer data. Ensure that all devices have the latest anti-virus software and all users should be educated about the need to allow recommended virus updates.

3. Access to Customer Data

Not every employee needs access to your customer’s or employee’s personal information. Keep access to sensitive customer information limited to those who need it to perform their job duties. The fewer people who have access to data, the fewer opportunities for a breach.

4. Destroy Data No Longer Needed

Knowing how and when to destroy documents and data will help ensure your customers, employees, and businesses personal information stays safe. Determine how and when to destroy digital and paper documents and stay up to date with Data Disposal Laws.

Different professions have different requirements under the Data Disposal Laws. Make sure you follow the best practices of your industry.

Develop guidelines and policies for data retention inside your business to handle the storage and destruction of documents and data.

5. Work With a Professional

Customer data is a valuable resource for all firms. Businesses should safeguard it using all possible measures as failure to do so can damage an organization’s reputation and lead to huge losses.

Working with a professional company such as Federal Records Management & Shredding in Fort Wayne, IN is one of the best ways to protect confidential documents and data. Professional Records Management companies can help train employees on how to handle your customer’s and your businesses personal information as well as help you set data retention policies.

Simply deleting data or using store-bought shredders isn’t enough. A professional destruction company can help you make sure that your files are properly destroyed.

Need help protecting your businesses sensitive information? Contact us today to learn more about our records management, hard drive destruction, and on-site and off-site shredding services.

FERPA Regulations 101: How to Effectively Manage Educational Records

Students learn a lot, about a lot of things, during their time in class. College students learn about everything from physics equations to the thematic components of Manhattan Transfer. Most of all, they learn about their rights as students.

FERPA regulations guide how colleges and universities must handle student information. However, FERPA doesn’t just concern colleges, students, and educational information. The acronym stands for the Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Act since it also governs how administrators should maintain and distribute information to families.

Any educational institution that receives federal funding must abide by the rules set by FERPA. Otherwise, you can face worse consequences than losing funding; violating the law can result in criminal prosecution and accreditation loss. Make sure you don’t accidentally violate this vital law by learning more about it.

Keep reading below to learn more about how FERPA regulates how you can handle student information, and how you can stay in compliance with it!

Know What to Define as an Educational Record

The first thing you should understand about FERPA is that it sets clear guidelines on what is considered an educational record. Documents such as class schedules, grades, or anything else relating a student’s academic life is an educational record. Yet, anything involving university police or digital communications are not covered.

This means that anyone can request to view records of digital communications or police records since they’re public information. They’re not protected by FERPA, and public universities will need to comply with public information requests.

FERPA Regulations Limit Who Can View Files

FERPA explicitly states that students can view their own records, but only them. Nobody can request to see a student’s records unless the student themselves requests the record. It doesn’t matter if the person requesting records is a professor or a member of the student’s family.

This is meant to protect students’ privacy and allow them to have more control over their academic lives. It enables them to focus on what matters most: classes.

FERPA Protects Three Kinds of Information

There are three types of information that FERPA protects: educational information, personally identifiable information, and directory information. While each category has specific degrees of protection associated with it, it is generally illegal to distribute them. You can only give those kinds of information to the students they’re about.

Educational information can include anything about the student’s education, such as classes or grades. The category of personally identifiable information covers anything that can be used to identify a specific person, such as social security numbers*. Finally, directory information is a more unique kind of record.

Directory information can be distributed, as long as the university notifies students that their directory information may be released. This kind of information includes basic details such as names or addresses. It’s important to remember that the student should have time to request that their information remains private.

Violating FERPA Has Severe Consequences

Violating FERPA regulations will have severe consequences, no matter who you are or whatever institution you work for. Releasing information that should remain private will result in an investigation. You will also face consequences for failing to protect student information, too.

Keeping these confidential documents confidential also means knowing how to manage them. That’s why you should leave handling sensitive documents to the professionals. Contact us if you need a better way to maintain student information. We know FERPA inside and out, and will make sure you stay in compliance with it!

Data Destruction: What Data Should Your Company Destroy?

data destruction fort wayne

What if a little information really was a dangerous thing for your company? Many companies hold onto as much information as they can for both compliance purposes and record keeping. But it turns out there is some information that really should be destroyed.

Wondering what needs to be destroyed and what you should keep? Keep reading to find out!

Know the Rules

It’s important to destroy data that you no longer need. However, you may be legally required to hold onto certain data longer than other data.

For example, the IRS can look at business tax records that are up to six years old. Because of this, many individuals and businesses hold onto important records for seven years to play it safe.

Make sure that you are very familiar with the policies containing how long you must hold onto things like confidential information. Ensure this is followed by creating retention policies and enforcing them strictly throughout the company.

Why Destroy Data?

We’ve discussed knowing when to hold onto data and when to destroy it. But that leaves a big question: why destroy data in the first place?

The short answer to this is “efficiency.” And this efficiency extends to both the physical and the digital realms.

For example, if your computer hard drives and company e-mail are clogged with unnecessary data, things are going to move very slowly. And if this information is held as physical media, then it is literally taking up space that could be used for more valuable documents.

Plus, you never know who could access old data that you don’t destroy.

What Documents Should Be Destroyed?

Now you know why data destruction should be a priority for your company. What, then, should you be targeting? It turns out this is something of a trick question.

It’s generally good to hold onto things like employee records and tax documentation. And you should retain important information for employees such as their pension documentation.

Conversely, you can destroy the same data after a set period of time. For example, it is legal in many states to destroy these same records after a period of six years unless they are still useful or required (such as documentation that would be required for a current or upcoming legal case).

Beyond this minimum period of time, it is recommended to destroy as much physical and digital data as possible. Every file destroyed moves your company a step closer to peak efficiency!

What other documents should be shredded?

  • Employee pay stubs
  • Employment records and payroll information
  • Credit card bills or offers
  • Bank statements
  • ID cards
  • Legal documents
  • Canceled or voided checks
  • Anything with a signature
  • Budgets
  • Contracts
  • Strategic Reports
  • Training information
  • Appraisals
  • Applications
  • Purchase orders
  • Internal reports
  • Customer lists
  • Old computer hard drives
  • Any document with personal or confidential information

Methods of Data Destruction

So, you’re ready to destroy the data. How, then, do you go about it?

Physical data is relatively easy to destroy. It’s simple to shred selected documents. However, store purchased shredders leave larger pieces of information that can still be read or put back together. Instead, opt for a professional shredding company. They can help you come up with a destruction schedule to be sure your confidential documents are kept secure and private.

Electronic data is trickier to destroy. For example, it’s not enough to simply delete the files from a computer because such data can still be accessed from the device. Make sure your electronic data is properly destroyed by a hard drive destruction company.

Document Destruction in Fort Wayne

Now you know more about how data destruction works. But do you know who can help you complete this task? At Federal Records Management and Shredding, we specialize in safely and securely destroying both documents and data. Contact us today to learn how we can help you keep all of your files secure.

5 Industries That Really Need Document Management Systems

records management system fort wayne

Documents are big business and there’s no denying the fact that storing and organizing documents can be a major task. That’s why having a document management system capable of meeting the needs of business is crucial for operating efficiently. And yet not every industry has the same needs.

Read on to discover some of the industries that have the greatest need for powerful document management systems.

1. Government

This one should come as no surprise to anyone. After all, governments at all levels must compile and maintain vast amounts of documents. Federal, state, and local, have to be able to track countless documents for everything from taxes to passports to parking tickets.

From Washington, D.C. to the smallest county in your neck of the woods, governments process more documents than any other type of industry.

2. Manufacturing

There are so many aspects to manufacturing, that the number of documents required to keep everything running can be astounding.

Warehousing alone places a huge burden on a company’s ability to efficiently manage their documents. This is an industry that requires the tracking of parts, materials, shipments, invoices, and contracts, just to name a few.

It’s vital to be able to pull up information at a moment’s notice, make changes, and meet deadlines, as quickly and efficiently as possible at any hour of the day or night.

3. Healthcare

Imagine going to an appointment with your doctor, or having an emergency that requires hospital care, yet they don’t have the documentation necessary to process you. This would create a crisis.

Information is the lifeblood of the healthcare industry. From administration to healthcare professionals, to IT specialists, everything must run optimally at all times.

Healthcare companies depend on immediate access to patient records and compliance documents, as well as insurance information. This is a massive and dynamic industry with massive document management needs.

4. Transportation

There is no end to the document management needs of the transportation industry. This is an industry that relies on complicated logistics, where documentation is constantly changing and must be available around the clock. Whether shipping over the road, by rail, sea or sky, every other industry on the planet relies on transportation to deliver products on time, and that’s no easy task.

5. Education

The final industry on our list is education. Every educational institution relies on good documentation management to keep up with every aspect of student life. From transcripts to testing, to grades, this information is important and must be efficiently managed.

You can’t put a price on education, and the education industry can’t put a price on the value of a good document management system.

The Importance of Document Management Systems

This article only scratches the surface on industries that rely on good document management systems.

No matter what industry you are in, you simply cannot operate efficiently without the support of reliable documentation. And the quality of your document management could be the difference between success or failure.

If you need help with your document management, give us a call today to learn how we can help your business run more efficiently and effectively.

Next, see 5 reasons why data protection is more important than ever for your business.

5 Tips for Safe and Sustainable E-Waste Disposal

Did you know that the average American family throws out 176 pounds of e-waste every year? That’s equal to about 400 iPhones. Examples of e-waste include smartphones, tablets, printers, and computers.

Businesses have even more e-waste to dispose of each year. After all, they have more monitors, printers, and hard drives than the average family. These items can quickly become outdated and when a device reaches the end of its lifespan, it’s time to replace it.

But what do you do with items when you know longer need them? These five tips will help you manage e-waste disposal for your company.

1. Find Local E-Waste Disposal Programs

The first thing to do is check in with your local waste disposal programs. Your local government may have programs in place to manage e-garbage with little trouble. Other local businesses may also have programs for the recycling of e-waste. As a business, you may have more e-waste than they expect. Talk to them, and make arrangements to handle the amount of e-waste your business produces.

2. Donate Used Items

Another way to deal with electronic devices that are no longer needed in your business is to donate them. Provided the items are in good working order, they can be redistributed.

3. Sell Working Devices

Another thing your business can do is resell used devices you no longer need. As long as it’s in good working order, you shouldn’t have a problem selling an iPhone or a computer on eBay or Craig’s List. You may even be able to sell devices that don’t work any longer. Some purchasers salvage parts from these devices to fix other devices.

4. Plan Ahead

One of the causes of e-waste is a lack of planning. Purchasing equipment such as a computer is a business decision you plan and cost carefully. You should also make sure you plan for the end of the item’s life, including how it will be disposed of. You may not think of smaller items, such as portable hard drives or other electronic gadgets. Many of these items are handed out at conferences, so you may not think twice about trashing them. If you attend a conference with these gifts, ask if there’s a program for recycling them. If you don’t need one, don’t take one. If you’re planning the conference, be sure to think ahead about disposal before you opt for these gifts. The best way to reduce electronic garbage is to buy less in the first place.

5. Check the Recycler’s Credentials

There will be times when you can’t avoid needing to dispose of your e-waste. When that happens, always be sure to check the credentials of the recycler you choose. Working with a certified recycling company means you can trust your e-waste is disposed of properly.

Protecting Your Business

You have many options for e-waste disposal. Keep in mind that disposal isn’t always the right answer for your electronic devices. Keeping your data safe should be one of your top priorities. In some cases, you’ll need to use other measures when you have devices that have reached the end of their lifespan such as destroy the hard drives to protect confidential information.

Our blog has many more tips for keeping all your business data safe. Read up on how to destroy a hard drive or the benefits of paper shredding to protect your data.

Strictly Confidential: Here Are 3 Types of Confidential Documents You Should Keep an Eye on at Your Workplace

confidential records

A recent study found that most companies don’t have the technology to keep employees from sharing confidential documents. What’s worse, 68% of companies surveyed said they don’t know where their confidential info is stored.

Part of keeping your company’s confidential documents safe is understanding what types of documents are confidential. Here’s a list of 3 types of confidential documentation that you should take good care of.

1. Contracts and Commercial Documents

Some of the most important confidential documents include contracts and other business documents. Confidential documentation must be properly handled and stored to protect both your organization and the third-party.

Most contracts have a confidentiality clause. Your contract with important clients could become void if it fell into the wrong hands. Plus, contracts have a lot of sensitive data. Such as the cost of the services, and the names of the involved parties. If a competitor got their hands on this document, they could use it to hurt your business or steal your clients.

Make sure you limit physical copies of commercial documents. Keep those copies in a confidential file that is not easily accessible.

You may also consider offsite record storage for additional security.

2. Confidential Employee Information

Another important aspect of confidential documentation is employee information. This includes personal data such as Social Security Numbers, date of birth, marital status, and mailing address.

Identity theft is a huge issue that requires constant vigilance. In fact, in 2017 one in 15 people were victims of identity theft.

Safe employee information prevents identity theft and fraud. But there’s much more employee information that should be housed in a confidential file. This includes employee resumes, background checks, interview notes and tests, performance reviews and disciplinary paperwork. Employment information such as pay rate, employment contract, level of benefits, vacation and bonuses are also confidential documentation.

There are also a number of admin info related to employees that need to be kept safe. This includes pay stubs or direct deposit forms. Tax forms, time sheets, and any other payroll documentation as well. Even once an employee is no longer an employee, you still need to keep their data confidential. For example, resignation letters, unemployment claims, and termination records.

3. Office Plans and Internal Documentation

Many people don’t realize that their office floor plans, seating arrangements, internal processes, and procedure manuals are confidential documents.

Most organizations have detailed office layouts that include exits, seating plans and so on. You likely also have some procedures that employees need to be able to do their work. Sure, all your employees have access to them. But you don’t want it to get into the hands of those who would use it for nefarious purposes.

If you can, store these documents electronically. Ask employees to limit print outs. And when a version becomes old, make sure it is securely shredded.

Final Thoughts on Confidential Documents at Work

We hope this list helps you see the extent of the confidential documents in your organization. By becoming more aware of what counts as confidential, you can take steps to ensure it is safe.

Need help coming up with a records management and shredding plan to keep your documents safe? Contact us. We help companies in and around Fort Wayne keep their confidential records safe and we can help you too.

Next, learn 5 ways to avoid customer data theft.